Jochiwon: Where Is The Train Station?

A train headed towards Daejeon pulls into Jochiwon  Station on Monday, January 27. (The Sejong Dish/ Salgu Wissmath)

A train headed towards Daejeon pulls into Jochiwon Station on Monday, January 27. (The Sejong Dish/ Salgu Wissmath)

If you want to get around in Korea there are many options to choose from.  There are trains, buses, taxis, subways, and of course, sidewalks.

The train system here in Korea is very well developed, and there are many trains to choose from.

The Mugunghwa, named after the national flower of South Korea, is the slowest and most available option when traveling to and from Jochiwon Station.

The Nuriro is a more recent development in the train system, and it is similar to the Mugunghwa.

The Saemaeul is faster than the Mugunghwa, makes less stops, and has more legroom in the seats. It also includes a first-class section in car number 1 for a slightly higher price.

If you want to travel fast, the KTX is the best choice; it travels at a maximum of 305 KM/H (190 MPH).  The KTX makes stops only at KTX designated stations. Unfortunately, Jochiwon does not have a KTX station.  The nearest KTX station is in Osong which is about 15 minutes away by car. A taxi will cost about 10,000 won.

In Korean Jochiwon Station is “Jochiwon yeok/ 조치원역.” If you want to take a taxi to the Jochiwon train station just tell the taxi driver, “Jochiwon yeok/ 조치원역,” or more politely, “Jochiwon yeok ga-joo-say-yo/ 조치원역 가주세요.”

For more information on trains and up-to-the-minute train times please visit the Korail website.

About Michael Thayer

Michael Thayer is from Newton, Iowa. He graduated from Central College in Iowa with a major in International Studies in 2009. Michael arrived in Korea in May of 2012, where he began working at Daedong Elementary school in Jochiwon. Michael enjoys reading, and even began an English book club in Jochiwon. His other hobbies include cooking and learning new things about Korean culture. What is Michael’s favorite thing about teaching English? He says it is hearing students sing English songs outside of class just because it’s fun or because they want to, rather than because it’s required. View all posts by Michael Thayer →

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