A Brief History Of Sejong City

The Sejong Government Complex in Sejong City houses the agriculture, education, fair trade, and many other departments of the Korean government. Sejong City was founded on July 1st, 2012 in order to relocate several government departments away from Seoul. (Salgu Wissmath/ The Sejong Dish)

The Sejong Government Complex in Sejong City houses the agriculture, education, fair trade, and many other departments of the Korean government. Sejong City was founded on July 1st, 2012 in order to relocate several government departments away from Seoul. (Salgu Wissmath/ The Sejong Dish)

Founded  on July 1st, 2012, Sejong City is a fairly new district in Korea that has been designed with a special purpose.

The idea for Sejong City began when President No Mu-Hyeon (2003-2008) said that he wanted to build a new city in Yeongi-gun. Yeongi-gun is the region that Jochiwon was part of before it was absorbed into Sejong City.

The name Sejong City, officially Sejong Special Autonomous City, was decided upon at the end of 2006. This city was named after King Sejong of the Joseon dynasty.  He is known as one of the greatest kings in Korean history; he created the Korean alphabet and listened well to his citizens.

The reason for building this new city was because too much of the country was developing in Seoul; one fifth of Koreans live in Seoul.  The government wanted to relocate some of it’s departments to a new city in order to balance the development of Korea.

Sejong City is most well known for it’s government complex which houses the agriculture, education, fair trade, and many other departments of the Korean government.

About Michael Thayer

Michael Thayer is from Newton, Iowa. He graduated from Central College in Iowa with a major in International Studies in 2009. Michael arrived in Korea in May of 2012, where he began working at Daedong Elementary school in Jochiwon. Michael enjoys reading, and even began an English book club in Jochiwon. His other hobbies include cooking and learning new things about Korean culture. What is Michael’s favorite thing about teaching English? He says it is hearing students sing English songs outside of class just because it’s fun or because they want to, rather than because it’s required. View all posts by Michael Thayer →

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